Chemotherapy once meant:

  • An extended series of visits to a treatment center,
  • Where the patient would be hooked up to an IV, often for hours, and infused with a heavy dose of anticancer drugs and supportive care medicines,
  • All while being constantly monitored by healthcare professionals.

Nowadays, that same process often can be accomplished by simply sending the patient home with a bottle of pills. Read More Here.

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Although oral chemotherapy has dramatically changed the face of cancer treatment, how the drugs are dispensed can be nearly as important as the drugs themselves.

“It’s one thing to prescribe an oral medicine for a patient,” said Guri K. Doshi, MD, a urinary and prostate cancer specialist with Texas Oncology, the state’s largest cancer care provider. “It’s another to get it into their hands.” Read more here.

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Chris Kepinski speaking at AJMC’s Institute for Value-Based Medicine

NCODA member Chris Kepinski, clinical oncology pharmacy manager for Southern Oncology Specialists in North Carolina, recently spoke on a national panel regarding advancing quality in oncology care as part of the Institute for Value-Based Medicine, a new initiative of The American Journal of Managed Care.

Read entire article in AJMC Here

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The addition of abemaciclib (Verzenio) to initial treatment with a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor appeared effective for women with hormone receptor-positive, HER-2-negative advanced breast cancer, according to results of the double-blind, phase 3 MONARCH 3 study presented at American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

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Accumulator programs target specialty drugs for which a manufacturer provides copayment assistance. Unlike conventional benefit designs, the manufacturer’s payments no longer count toward a patient’s deductible or out-of-pocket maximum. Plan sponsors (employers and health plans) will save big money because accumulators shift a majority of drug costs to patients and manufacturers. Accumulator programs will further lower a plan’s drug spending by discouraging the appropriate utilization of specialty therapies and reducing adherence.

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